Paul_Cezanne_Leda_au_cygne

One hundred and some lines

Above, Paul CĂ©zanne's Leda and the Swan

Below, a personal reflection that rings true and universal. Especially on this day, an hour before Donald Trump begins his presidency, instead of changing our profile photos, tweeting our loss of hope, crying publicly over Obama and, overall, taking pleasure and indulging in our "despair", these lines reminded me that we can also think about how we got here. To take a gentle, perhaps scary step back rather than run aggressively, blindly forward. Although there are no clear answers, in the lines of this poem or elsewhere, for that matter, there is something to be said about pointing fingers everywhere, equally, indiscriminately and being truthful with ourselves.

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Photo by Jora Vaso

The Bridge, Rejection, Give It Up!, and A Little Fable: Kafka’s short masterpieces

There is no better literature than the kind that makes you seek to understand but never reveals itself to you in its entirety. The moment you think you understand, you recall yet another word or phrase you conveniently forgot on your path to clear answers. To this literature, you must return…and return. The Bridge I was stiff and cold, I was a bridge, I lay … Continue reading The Bridge, Rejection, Give It Up!, and A Little Fable: Kafka’s short masterpieces

Errare_humanum_est

Seneca, My Latin Lover

One of the letters from Roman philosopher Lucius Annaeus Seneca to his friend, Lucilius Junior will be the reason I finally learn Latin. Greetings from Seneca to Lucilius Continue to act thus, my dear Lucilius—set yourself free for your own sake; gather and save your time, which til lately has been forced from you, or filched away, or has merely slipped from your hands. Make … Continue reading Seneca, My Latin Lover

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

The more I think back to this short story, the more I cannot think of a better metaphor than the phrase “shooting an elephant”. A metaphor for many things, for everything. For doing something unnecessarily cruel. For the loss of something only seemingly light. For the fall of something grand, like a peaceful and prosperous empire. For imprisoning yourself, and killing the greatest, most fundamental, … Continue reading Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

witch-wife

Love and Endless Desire by Edna St. Vincent Millay – My favorite sonnets

For me, her name has always sounded like the name of an exotic, dangerous volcano. As it turned out – after I read her poetry – my instincts were not too far off. The adjective that most succinctly describes the poetry of Edna St. Vincent Millay is “incendiary”. Perhaps not aggressively so, but incendiary, nonetheless. Her poems do not explode in a thousand burning flames, … Continue reading Love and Endless Desire by Edna St. Vincent Millay – My favorite sonnets

K. Mansfield

Katherine Mansfield on fear, fleeting moments and unspoken love

Risk! Risk anything! Care no more for the opinions of others, for those voices. Do the hardest thing on earth for you. Act for yourself. Face the truth.” Mansfield’s short story “Psychology” is perhaps not the most witty or wellwritten work from her, as several of her other works, such as “Bliss” and “A married man’s story” are truly masterpieces in storytelling. “Bliss” is a … Continue reading Katherine Mansfield on fear, fleeting moments and unspoken love